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Latest Content | AGE OF ROBOTS & Neurorobotics Magazines

Quantensimulator: first functional module

Superconducting quantum simulator surpasses conventional computers and could represent complicated biological processes such as plant metabolism. Cyclones, traffic congestion, demographic development; if one wants to predict the effect of such events, computer simulations provide important services. However, many processes in nature are so complicated that conventional computers fail to calculate.

Autonomous driving at the bus station

Application case Bus farm: study analyzes Feasibility and savings potential of autonomous driving – KIT, FZI and SSB create innovation at the interface between IT and mobility. Autonomous driving is an important building block of new mobility concepts – not only in the passenger car sector.

Case Western Reserve University researchers design soft, flexible origami-inspired robot

A Case Western Reserve University researcher has turned the origami she enjoyed as a child into a patent-pending soft robot that may one day be used on an assembly line, in surgery or even outer space. Kiju Lee, the Nord Distinguished Assistant Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, and her lab have moved from paper robots to 3-D-printed models that bend, contract, extend and twist.

Assessing Regional Earthquake Risk and Hazards in the Age of Exascale

Berkeley Lab researchers lead development of a workflow to accurately predict ground movement and its impact on structures. With emerging exascale supercomputers, researchers will soon be able to accurately simulate the ground motions of regional earthquakes quickly and in unprecedented detail, as well as predict how these movements will impact energy infrastructure—from the electric grid to local power plants—and scientific research facilities.

Computer visualizations bring new perspective to science

Working in Brown University’s Center for Computation and Visualization, application scientist Benjamin Knorlein, here with visiting scientist Tom Sgouros, helps turn research data into virtual reality. When a nationwide team of scientists earlier this year wanted to study populations of tiny phytoplankton, why did they invite Brown University computer visualization expert Benjamin Knorlein with them on the voyage?

Using Artificial Intelligence for Healthy Living

IBM Research and the University of California San Diego have announced a multiyear commitment to enhance quality of life and independence for aging populations through the new Artificial Intelligence for Healthy Living Center (AIHL), located on the campus of UC San Diego. The groundbreaking center will bring together the technology, cognitive and life sciences strengths of IBM and UC San Diego.

App-based citizen science experiment could help researchers predict future pandemics

A new app gives UK residents the chance to get involved in an ambitious, ground-breaking science experiment that could save lives. Scientists from the University of Cambridge and London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine are attempting to collect a gold standard data set that can be used to predict how the next pandemic flu would spread through this country – and what can be done to stop it. They need your help.

Two intelligent vehicles are better than one

Intelligent vehicles get their intelligence from cameras, Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) sensors, and navigation and mapping systems. But there are ways to make them even smarter. Researchers at EPFL are working to improve the reliability and fault tolerance of these systems by combining the data they gather with that from other vehicles.

Data Storage Options

Limited space and power are driving forces in the quest to find, in the most preferable scenario, limitless data storage. So far, what we use compared to what is available is only a drop in the bucket. This does not seem like a problem given there is only a slow and...

Type 2 diabetes successfully managed online

People with type 2 diabetes could improve their health by using a new web-based self-management tool, according to new research. The results, published in BMJ Open, and funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), come from the first UK-based trial of its kind and show that patients using the HeLP-Diabetes programme have better diabetes control after 12 months.

Graphene forged into three-dimensional shapes

Researchers from Finland and Taiwan have discovered how graphene, a single-atom-thin layer of carbon, can be forged into three-dimensional objects by using laser light. A striking illustration was provided when the researchers fabricated a pyramid with a height of 60 nm, which is about 200 times larger than the thickness of a graphene sheet.

Biodegradable microsensors for food monitoring

A new generation of microsensors could provide the vital link between food products and the Internet of Things. ETH researchers have developed an ultra-thin temperature sensor that is both biocompatible and biodegradable. A team of researchers led by Giovanni Salvatore, post-doc in the Electronics Laboratory, has been working with scientists from other ETH institutes on the development of biodegradable microsensors for temperature measurement.

Paper Supercapacitor

By coating ordinary paper with layers of gold nanoparticles and other materials, researchers have fabricated flexible paper supercapacitors that exhibit the best performance of any textile-type supercapacitor to date. In particular, the paper supercapacitors address one of the biggest challenges in this area, which is to achieve a high energy density in addition to an already high power density, since both properties are essential for realizing high-performance energy-storage devices.

Landmark study suggests risks vary widely in drone-human impacts

New Virginia Tech research suggests there’s wide variation in the risk that unmanned aircraft pose to people on the ground. Many of the most promising applications for these aircraft — including package delivery, public safety, and traffic management — entail flights over people and raise the possibility, however unlikely, of an impact between the aircraft and a human.

Drones can almost see in the dark

UZH researchers have taught drones how to fly using an eye-inspired camera, opening the door to them performing fast, agile maneuvers and flying in low-light environments. Possible applications could include supporting rescue teams with search missions at dusk or dawn.

Besting the owl’s aerodynamics

Feather-inspired design cuts wind turbine noise. A team of researchers studying the acoustics of owl flight is working to pinpoint the mechanisms that accomplish this virtual silence to improve man-made aerodynamic and aeroacoustic design—of wind turbines, aircraft, underwater vehicles, and automobiles.

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