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Skin-inspired coating that’s as hard as teeth and can heal itself

Self-healing smart coatings could someday make scratches on cell phones a thing of the past. But researchers often have to compromise between strength and the ability to self-repair when developing these materials. Now, one group reports in ACS Nano the development of a smart coating that is as hard as tooth enamel on the outside but can heal itself like skin can.

Engineers 3-D print shape-shifting smart gel

3D printing becomes 4D as objects morph over time and temperatures change. Rutgers engineers have invented a “4D printing” method for a smart gel that could lead to the development of “living” structures in human organs and tissues, soft robots and targeted drug delivery.

Applying Machine Learning to the Universe’s Mysteries

Berkeley Lab scientists teach machines to analyze simulations of exotic subatomic ‘soup.’ Computers can beat chess champions, simulate star explosions, and forecast global climate. We are even teaching them to be infallible problem-solvers and fast learners.

Quantum race accelerates development of silicon quantum chip

The worldwide race to create more, better and reliable quantum processors is progressing fast, as a team of TU Delft scientists led by Professor Vandersypen has realised yet again. In a neck-and-neck race with their competitors, they showed that quantum information of an electron spin can be transported to a photon, in a silicon quantum chip. This is important in order to connect quantum bits across the chip and allowing to scale up to large numbers of qubits. Their work was published today in the journal Science.

Researchers from TU Delft combine spintronics and nanophotonics in 2D material

Researchers from the Kavli Institute of Nanoscience at TU Delft, working with the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research’s AMOLF institute, have now found a way to convert the spin information into a predictable light signal at room temperature. The discovery brings the worlds of spintronics and nanophotonics closer together and might lead to the development of an energy-efficient way of processing data, in data centres, for example.

New biosensor could monitor glucose levels in tears and sweat

Constantly tracking a person’s glucose levels through their tears or sweat could be one step closer to providing people with diabetes an improved monitoring tool. Researchers report in the journal ACS Nano the development of an ultra-thin, flexible sensor that could be incorporated into contact lenses or on the backs of watches for real-time glucose tracking.

The New Age of Manufacturing

 The Moving Upstream team from the Wall Street Journal go to Asia to see the next generation of industrial robots, what they're capable of, and whether they’re friend or foe to low-skilled workers. What is the real impact of automation on human jobs and the economy....

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