Nanotechnology

Nanotechnology

The very small in an age of robots

The Very Tiny

Nanotechnology is going to change the way we live in ways that are hard to imagine. Manipulating molecules into tiny machines and new materials is a frontier that will revolutionise manufacturing, robotics, and life in general. Watch this space – it’s one of the most exciting things that’s happening in the second machine age.

Letting molecular robots swarm like birds

A team of researchers from Hokkaido University and Kansai University has developed DNA-assisted molecular robots that autonomously swarm in response to chemical and physical signals, paving the way for developing future nano-machines.

Building Molecular Wires, One Atom at a Time

Electronic devices are getting smaller and smaller. Early computers filled entire rooms. Today you can hold one in the palm of your hand. Now the field of molecular electronics is taking miniaturization to the next level. Researchers are creating electronic components so tiny they can’t be seen with the naked eye.

Researchers show how nanoscale patterning can decrease metal fatigue

A new study in the journal Nature shows how metals can be patterned at the nanoscale to be more resistant to fatigue, the slow accumulation of internal damage from repetitive strain. The research focused on metal manufactured with nanotwins, tiny linear boundaries in a metal’s atomic lattice that have identical crystalline structures on either side.

Understanding how electrons turn to glass

New insights into the behaviour of electrons as liquids transform to glass are deepening our understanding of this transition phase. Researchers at Tohoku University have gained new insight into the electronic processes that guide the transformation of liquids into a solid crystalline or glassy state. The ability of some liquids to transition into glass has been exploited since ancient times. But many fundamental aspects of this transition phase are far from understood.

Taming “Wild” Electrons in Graphene

Discovery could lead to novel electronic devices. Graphene – a one-atom-thick layer of the stuff in pencils – is a better conductor than copper and is very promising for electronic devices, but with one catch: Electrons that move through it can’t be stopped.

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