Nanotechnology

Nanotechnology

The very small in an age of robots

The Very Tiny

Nanotechnology is going to change the way we live in ways that are hard to imagine. Manipulating molecules into tiny machines and new materials is a frontier that will revolutionise manufacturing, robotics, and life in general. Watch this space – it’s one of the most exciting things that’s happening in the second machine age.

Researchers show how nanoscale patterning can decrease metal fatigue

A new study in the journal Nature shows how metals can be patterned at the nanoscale to be more resistant to fatigue, the slow accumulation of internal damage from repetitive strain. The research focused on metal manufactured with nanotwins, tiny linear boundaries in a metal’s atomic lattice that have identical crystalline structures on either side.

Understanding how electrons turn to glass

New insights into the behaviour of electrons as liquids transform to glass are deepening our understanding of this transition phase. Researchers at Tohoku University have gained new insight into the electronic processes that guide the transformation of liquids into a solid crystalline or glassy state. The ability of some liquids to transition into glass has been exploited since ancient times. But many fundamental aspects of this transition phase are far from understood.

Taming “Wild” Electrons in Graphene

Discovery could lead to novel electronic devices. Graphene – a one-atom-thick layer of the stuff in pencils – is a better conductor than copper and is very promising for electronic devices, but with one catch: Electrons that move through it can’t be stopped.

New technique produces tunable, nanoporous materials

A collaborative group of researchers including Petr Kral, professor of chemistry at the University of Illinois at Chicago, describe a new technique for creating novel nanoporous materials with unique properties that can be used to filter molecules or light. They describe their research in the journal Science.

Terahertz spectroscopy goes nano

Brown University researchers have improved the resolution of terahertz emission spectroscopy — a technique used to study a wide variety of materials — by 1,000-fold, making the technique useful at the nanoscale.

This nanoelectronics breakthrough could lead to more efficient quantum devices

A Concordia study, published in Nature Communications, reveals the potential for even smarter transistors. Researchers from Concordia have made a breakthrough that could help your electronic devices get even smarter. McRae, the paper’s lead author, explains the research. “Our study sheds light on problems engineers face when building molecular nanoelectronics, and how they might be able to overcome them by harnessing the quantum nature of electrons,” he says.

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