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Robotics | AGE OF ROBOTS & Neurorobotics Magazines

Robotics

Robotics in the Second Machine Age

We are entering an age of robots that are infiltrating many areas of work and life in general. This department is following the development of robotics in this new machine age.

Case Western Reserve University researchers design soft, flexible origami-inspired robot

A Case Western Reserve University researcher has turned the origami she enjoyed as a child into a patent-pending soft robot that may one day be used on an assembly line, in surgery or even outer space. Kiju Lee, the Nord Distinguished Assistant Professor of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, and her lab have moved from paper robots to 3-D-printed models that bend, contract, extend and twist.

App-based citizen science experiment could help researchers predict future pandemics

A new app gives UK residents the chance to get involved in an ambitious, ground-breaking science experiment that could save lives. Scientists from the University of Cambridge and London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine are attempting to collect a gold standard data set that can be used to predict how the next pandemic flu would spread through this country – and what can be done to stop it. They need your help.

Biodegradable microsensors for food monitoring

A new generation of microsensors could provide the vital link between food products and the Internet of Things. ETH researchers have developed an ultra-thin temperature sensor that is both biocompatible and biodegradable. A team of researchers led by Giovanni Salvatore, post-doc in the Electronics Laboratory, has been working with scientists from other ETH institutes on the development of biodegradable microsensors for temperature measurement.

Landmark study suggests risks vary widely in drone-human impacts

New Virginia Tech research suggests there’s wide variation in the risk that unmanned aircraft pose to people on the ground. Many of the most promising applications for these aircraft — including package delivery, public safety, and traffic management — entail flights over people and raise the possibility, however unlikely, of an impact between the aircraft and a human.

Drones can almost see in the dark

UZH researchers have taught drones how to fly using an eye-inspired camera, opening the door to them performing fast, agile maneuvers and flying in low-light environments. Possible applications could include supporting rescue teams with search missions at dusk or dawn.

A drone for last-centimeter delivery

A new drone developed at EPFL uses cutting-edge technology to deliver parcels weighing up to 500 grams. The device will never get stuck in traffic, it’s programmed to avoid obstacles, and it can reach destinations on steep or uneven terrain. Its protective cage and foldable design mean that it can be carried around in a backpack and used in total safety.

Click beetles inspire design of self-righting robots

Robots perform many tasks that humans can’t or don’t want to perform, getting around on intricately designed wheels and limbs. If they tip over, however, they are rendered almost useless. A team of University of Illinois mechanical engineers and entomologists are looking to click beetles, who can right themselves without the use of their legs, to solve this robotics challenge.

PrivacyStreams Helps Developers Create Privacy Friendly Apps

Decision to share personal data need not be all or nothing. A smartphone app that uses the raw feed from a device’s microphone or accesses its contact list can raise red flags for a user concerned about privacy. In many cases, however, the app doesn’t need all the details that users find most sensitive.

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Robotics Department Head

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