Society

Society

Society in an age of robots

How Society is Changing in the Second Machine Age

Technology is shaping society, as it has always done so, but at a rate never experienced before in the history of mankind. This department is tracking the impact technology has on the fabric of our societies and humanity in general.

When toys meet virtual reality

The playroom is about to acquire a virtual dimension thanks to a new app. Researchers at ETH Zurich’s Game Technology Center want to use the app to inspire children’s imaginations and encourage creativity. It is now available in app stores to coincide with today’s Digitaltag.

Transfer Technique Produces Wearable Gallium Nitride Gas Sensors

A transfer technique based on thin sacrificial layers of boron nitride could allow high-performance gallium nitride gas sensors to be grown on sapphire substrates and then transferred to metallic or flexible polymer support materials. The technique could facilitate the production of low-cost wearable, mobile and disposable sensing devices for a wide range of environmental applications.

How to store information in your clothes invisibly, without electronics

A new type of smart fabric developed at the University of Washington could pave the way for jackets that store invisible passcodes and open the door to your apartment or office. The UW computer scientists have created fabrics and fashion accessories that can store data — from security codes to identification tags — without needing any on-board electronics or sensors.

Fully integrated circuits printed directly onto fabric

Researchers have successfully incorporated washable, stretchable and breathable electronic circuits into fabric, opening up new possibilities for smart textiles and wearable electronics. The circuits were made with cheap, safe and environmentally friendly inks, and printed using conventional inkjet printing techniques.

Innovative material for soft sensor could bring new tactile tech

A new type of soft and stretchable sensor could find uses in applications ranging from athletics and health monitoring to prosthetics and virtual reality. The technology, called iSoft, is capable of sensing in real-time, or without delay, and can perform “multimodal” sensing, or sensing a variety of stimuli such as continuous contact and stretching in all directions.

Matthew Dahlitz

Matthew Dahlitz

Department Head

Matthew is Editor-in-Chief of The Neuropsychotherapist, a psychotherapist with a keen interest in neuroscience and technology.

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