Artificial Intelligence

Artificial Intelligence

Artificial Intelligence in the Second Machine Age

The advancement of artificial intelligence (AI) in this second machine age is, and will continue to be, the defining feature of this age. With smart machines everything changes. This department tracks what is happening on the AI front and how this technology is changing every area of our lives.

Machine learning used to predict earthquakes in a lab setting

A group of researchers from the UK and the US have used machine learning techniques to successfully predict earthquakes. Although their work was performed in a laboratory setting, the experiment closely mimics real-life conditions, and the results could be used to predict the timing of a real earthquake.

Machine Learning Detects Marketing and Sale of Opioids on Twitter

Using advanced machine learning, a cross disciplinary team of University of California San Diego researchers developed technology that mined Twitter to identify entities illegally selling prescription opioids online. Between June and November 2015, some 619,937 tweets containing the keywords codeine, Percocet, fentanyl, Vicodin, Oxycontin, oxycodone and hydrocodone were collected.

Band Gaps, Made to Order

Engineers create atomically thin superlattice materials with precision. Control is a constant challenge for materials scientists, who are always seeking the perfect material — and the perfect way of treating it — to induce exactly the right electronic or optical activity required for a given application.

Slowing the clockwork

Progress on the way to smart nanomachines: LMU chemists have modified the synthesis of a molecular motor so as to reduce the speed of its light-driven rotation, thus permitting the researchers to analyze the mechanism of motion in complete detail.

Artificial intelligence for obtaining chemical fingerprints

Neural networks carry out chemical simulations in record time. Researchers at the Universities of Vienna and Göttingen have succeeded in developing a method for predicting molecular infrared spectra based on artificial intelligence. These chemical “fingerprints” could only be simulated by common prediction techniques for small molecules in high quality. With the help of the new technology, which is based on neuronal networks similar to the human brain and is therefore capable of learning, the team led by Philipp Marquetand from the Faculty of Chemistry at the University of Vienna was able to carry out simulations that were previously not possible.

Position Open

Position Open

AI Department Head

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