Category: Quantum

Essential quantum computer component downsized by two orders of magnitude

Researchers at IST Austria have built compact photon directional devices. Their micrometer-scale, nonmagnetic devices route microwave photons and can shield qubits from harmful noise. Qubits, or quantum bits, are the key building blocks that lie at the heart of every quantum computer. In order to perform a computation, signals need to be directed to and from qubits.

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New quantum materials offer novel route to 3D electronic devices

Researchers have shown how the principles of general relativity open the door to novel electronic applications such as a three-dimensional electron lens and electronic invisibility devices. In a new study funded by the Academy of Finland, Aalto University researchers Alex Westström and Teemu Ojanen propose a method to go beyond special relativity and simulate Einstein’s theory of general relativity in inhomogeneous Weyl semimetals.

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Finding Majoranas

Nano-‘hashtags’ could be the key to generating the highly sought Majorana quasiparticle. UC Santa Barbara scientists are on the cusp of a major advance in topological quantum computing. In a paper that appears in the journal Nature, Chris Palmstrøm, a UCSB professor of electrical and computer engineering and of materials, and colleagues describe a method by which “hashtag”– shaped nanowires may be coaxed to generate Majorana quasiparticles.

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Quantum Computing with Molecules for a Quicker Search of Unsorted Databases

Grover’s Quantum Algorithm Successfully Implemented – Superposition Manipulated and Read out Electrically – Publication in Physical Review Letters. Scrapbooks or social networks are collections of mostly unsorted data. The search for single elements in very large data volumes, i.e. for the needle in the data haystack, is extremely complex for classical computers. Scientists of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have now quantum mechanically implemented and successfully executed Glover’s algorithm, a process for the quick finding of a search element in unsorted databases.

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Researchers Develop Data Bus for Quantum Computer

The quantum world is fragile; error correction codes are needed to protect the information stored in a quantum object from the deteriorating effects of noise. Quantum physicists in Innsbruck have developed a protocol to pass quantum information between differently encoded building blocks of a future quantum computer, such as processors and memories.

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Quantum computing on the move

Decisive milestone for scaling up quantum computers. A future quantum computer, using “quantum bits” or qubits, might be able to solve problems which are not tractable for classical computers. Scientists are currently struggling to build devices with more than a few qubits, with the challenge arising that the qubits mutually hamper each other’s proper operation.

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Nanomagnets Levitate Thanks to Quantum Physics

Quantum physicists in Oriol Romero-Isart’s research group in Innsbruck show in two current publications that, despite Earnshaw’s theorem, nanomagnets can be stably levitated in an external static magnetic field owing to quantum mechanical principles. The quantum angular momentum of electrons, which also causes magnetism, is accountable for this mechanism.

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Forget about it

Even as the power of our modern computers grows exponentially, biological systems — like our brains — remain the ultimate learning machines. By finding materials that act in ways similar to the mechanisms that biology uses to retain and process information, scientists hope to find clues to help us build smarter computers.

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Chemical treatment improves quantum dot lasers

One of the secrets to making tiny laser devices such as ophthalmic surgery scalpels work even more efficiently is the use of tiny semiconductor particles, called quantum dots. In new research at Los Alamos National Laboratory’s Nanotech Team, the ~nanometer-sized dots are being doctored, or “doped,” with additional electrons, a treatment that nudges the dots ever closer to producing the desired laser light with less stimulation and energy loss.

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Quantensimulator: first functional module

Superconducting quantum simulator surpasses conventional computers and could represent complicated biological processes such as plant metabolism. Cyclones, traffic congestion, demographic development; if one wants to predict the effect of such events, computer simulations provide important services. However, many processes in nature are so complicated that conventional computers fail to calculate.

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Quantum Computation to Tackle Fundamental Science Problems

Berkeley Lab receives $3 million per year to explore quantum computing for science. For more than 50 years, Moore’s Law has reigned supreme. The observation that the number of transistors on a computer chip doubles roughly every two years has set the pace for our modern digital revolution—making smartphones, personal computers and current supercomputers possible.

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Exotic quantum states made from light

Physicists at the University of Bonn create optical “wells” for a super-photon for the first time. They’ve have managed to create optical hollows and more complex patterns into which the light of a Bose-Einstein condensate flows. The creation of such highly low-loss structures for light is a prerequisite for complex light circuits, such as for quantum information processing for a new generation of computers.

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Quantum Communications Bend to Our Needs

By changing the wavelengths of entangled photons to those used in telecommunications, researchers see quantum technology take a major leap forward. The potential for photon entanglement in quantum computing and communications has been known for decades. One of the issues impeding its immediate application is the fact that many photon entanglement platforms do not operate within the range used by most forms of telecommunication.

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New Quantum Phenomena in Graphene Superlattices

A team of Graphene Flagship researchers led by the University of Manchester reported in the journal Science showing the first new type of quantum oscillation to be reported for thirty years. This occurs by applying a magnetic field and it is the first of its kind to be present at high temperature and on the mesoscale. This research also sheds light on the Hofstadter butterfly phenomenon.

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