Category: Robotics

‘Pull’ from an implanted robot could help grow stunted organs

Surgeons at Boston Children’s Hospital have long sought a better solution for long-gap esophageal atresia, a rare birth defect in which part of the esophagus is missing. The current state-of-the art operation, called the Foker process, uses sutures anchored to children’s backs to gradually pull the unjoined ends of esophagus until they’re long enough to be stitched together.

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Helping hands guide robots as they learn

Rice engineers refine method to instruct robots to collaborate through demonstration. Like toddlers, robots can use a little help as they learn to function in the physical world. That’s the purpose of a Rice University program that gently guides robots toward the most helpful, human-like ways to collaborate on tasks.

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Robot drummer posts pictures of jamming sessions on Facebook

Scientists have developed a drumming robot that plays along with human keyboard players and posts pictures of the sessions on Facebook. The study, by researchers at Queen Mary University of London, looks at how humans interact with robots over time and in particular how social media can enhance that relationship.

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Engineers program tiny robots to move, think like insects

While engineers have had success building tiny, insect-like robots, programming them to behave autonomously like real insects continues to present technical challenges. A group of Cornell engineers has been experimenting with a new type of programming that mimics the way an insect’s brain works, which could soon have people wondering if that fly on the wall is actually a fly.

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First-Of-Its-Kind Bioengineered Robotic Hand To Sense Touch

The sense of touch is often taken for granted. For someone without a limb or hand, losing that sense of touch can be devastating. While highly sophisticated prostheses with complex moving fingers and joints are available to mimic almost every hand motion, they remain frustratingly difficult and unnatural for the user. This is largely because they lack the tactile experience that guides every movement.

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Flexible ‘skin’ can help robots, prosthetics perform everyday tasks by sensing shear force

Engineers from the University of Washington and UCLA have developed a flexible sensor “skin” to accurately convey information about shear forces and vibration to grasp, manipulate objects. If a robot is sent to disable a roadside bomb — or delicately handle an egg while cooking you an omelet — it needs to be able to sense when objects are slipping out of its grasp.

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