Category: Wearable Technology

New biosensor could monitor glucose levels in tears and sweat

Constantly tracking a person’s glucose levels through their tears or sweat could be one step closer to providing people with diabetes an improved monitoring tool. Researchers report in the journal ACS Nano the development of an ultra-thin, flexible sensor that could be incorporated into contact lenses or on the backs of watches for real-time glucose tracking.

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Virtual reality goes magnetic

International research team develops electronic “skin.” The recent success of Pokémon GO made many people very familiar with the concept of “augmented reality”: computer-generated perception blends into the real and virtual worlds. So far, these apps have largely used optical methods for motion detection.

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Transfer Technique Produces Wearable Gallium Nitride Gas Sensors

A transfer technique based on thin sacrificial layers of boron nitride could allow high-performance gallium nitride gas sensors to be grown on sapphire substrates and then transferred to metallic or flexible polymer support materials. The technique could facilitate the production of low-cost wearable, mobile and disposable sensing devices for a wide range of environmental applications.

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How to store information in your clothes invisibly, without electronics

A new type of smart fabric developed at the University of Washington could pave the way for jackets that store invisible passcodes and open the door to your apartment or office. The UW computer scientists have created fabrics and fashion accessories that can store data — from security codes to identification tags — without needing any on-board electronics or sensors.

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Innovative material for soft sensor could bring new tactile tech

A new type of soft and stretchable sensor could find uses in applications ranging from athletics and health monitoring to prosthetics and virtual reality. The technology, called iSoft, is capable of sensing in real-time, or without delay, and can perform “multimodal” sensing, or sensing a variety of stimuli such as continuous contact and stretching in all directions.

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In a first for wearable optics, researchers develop stretchy fiber to capture body motion

New fiber could offer safer, more reliable alternative to electrical motion sensors. The exciting applications of wearable sensors have sparked a tremendous amount of research and business investment in recent years. Sensors attached to the body or integrated into clothing could allow athletes and physical therapists to monitor their progress, provide a more detailed level of motion capture for computer games or animation, help engineers build robots with a lighter touch or form the basis for new types of real-time health monitors.

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Wearables to boost security of voice-based log-in

A security-token necklace, ear buds or eyeglasses developed at the University of Michigan could eliminate vulnerabilities in voice authentication—the practice of logging in to a device or service with your voice alone. Talking to electronics has become a popular—even essential—way to command them. In this era of the internet of things, voice assistants connect people to their mobile devices, homes and vehicles.

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Future smartwatches could sense hand movement using ultrasound imaging

New research has shown future wearable devices, such as smartwatches, could use ultrasound imaging to sense hand gestures. Computers are growing in number and wearable computers, such as smartwatches, are gaining popularity. Devices around the home, such as WiFi light bulbs and smart thermostats, are also on the increase. However, current technology limits the capability to interact with these devices.

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