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3D-printing gets a turbo boost from U-M technology

Algorithm allows 3-D printers to “read ahead” of their programming to boost speeds. A major drawback to 3-D printing – the slow pace of the work – could be alleviated through a software algorithm developed at the University of Michigan.

Finding Majoranas

Nano-‘hashtags’ could be the key to generating the highly sought Majorana quasiparticle. UC Santa Barbara scientists are on the cusp of a major advance in topological quantum computing. In a paper that appears in the journal Nature, Chris Palmstrøm, a UCSB professor of electrical and computer engineering and of materials, and colleagues describe a method by which “hashtag”– shaped nanowires may be coaxed to generate Majorana quasiparticles.

Math gets real in strong, lightweight structures

Rice University researchers use 3-D printers to turn century-old theory into complex schwarzites. Rice University engineers are using 3-D printers to turn structures that have until now existed primarily in theory into strong, light and durable materials with complex, repeating patterns. The porous structures called schwarzites are designed with computer algorithms, but Rice researchers found they could send data from the programs to printers and make macroscale, polymer models for testing.

Quantum Computing with Molecules for a Quicker Search of Unsorted Databases

Grover’s Quantum Algorithm Successfully Implemented – Superposition Manipulated and Read out Electrically – Publication in Physical Review Letters. Scrapbooks or social networks are collections of mostly unsorted data. The search for single elements in very large data volumes, i.e. for the needle in the data haystack, is extremely complex for classical computers. Scientists of Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) have now quantum mechanically implemented and successfully executed Glover’s algorithm, a process for the quick finding of a search element in unsorted databases.

Artist’s conception of doping process Breakthrough could launch organic electronics beyond cellphone screens

A discovery by an international team of researchers from Princeton University, the Georgia Institute of Technology and Humboldt University in Berlin points the way to more widespread use of an advanced technology generally known as organic electronics. The research, published Nov. 13 in the journal Nature Materials, focuses on organic semiconductors, a class of materials prized for their applications in emerging technologies such as flexible electronics, solar energy conversion, and high-quality color displays for smartphones and televisions.

Researchers Develop Data Bus for Quantum Computer

The quantum world is fragile; error correction codes are needed to protect the information stored in a quantum object from the deteriorating effects of noise. Quantum physicists in Innsbruck have developed a protocol to pass quantum information between differently encoded building blocks of a future quantum computer, such as processors and memories.

Wireless Handheld Spectrometer Transmits Data to Smartphone

Easy-to-use spectrometer costs less than $300, holds promise for remote medical diagnostics. Spectral images, which contain more color information than is obtainable with a typical camera, reveal characteristics of tissue and other biological samples that can’t be seen by the naked eye.

Quantum computing on the move

Decisive milestone for scaling up quantum computers. A future quantum computer, using “quantum bits” or qubits, might be able to solve problems which are not tractable for classical computers. Scientists are currently struggling to build devices with more than a few qubits, with the challenge arising that the qubits mutually hamper each other’s proper operation.

How to store information in your clothes invisibly, without electronics

A new type of smart fabric developed at the University of Washington could pave the way for jackets that store invisible passcodes and open the door to your apartment or office. The UW computer scientists have created fabrics and fashion accessories that can store data — from security codes to identification tags — without needing any on-board electronics or sensors.

Sensors applied to plant leaves warn of water shortage

Electronic circuits reveal when a plant begins to experience drought conditions. Engineers have created sensors that can be printed onto plant leaves and reveal when the plants are experiencing a water shortage, which could give farmers an early warning when their crops are in danger.

New RoboBee flies, dives, swims, and explodes out the of water

Hybrid robot could perform search and rescue missions, research studies, environmental monitoring. We’ve seen RoboBees that can fly, stick to walls, and dive into water. Now, get ready for a hybrid RoboBee that can fly, dive into water, swim, propel itself back out of water, and safely land.

Fully integrated circuits printed directly onto fabric

Researchers have successfully incorporated washable, stretchable and breathable electronic circuits into fabric, opening up new possibilities for smart textiles and wearable electronics. The circuits were made with cheap, safe and environmentally friendly inks, and printed using conventional inkjet printing techniques.

Flexible, stretchable photonic devices

Light-based devices could be used as biomedical sensors or as flexible connectors for electronics. Researchers have developed a way to make optically based microchips that can flex and bend like rubber and could be used for skin-mounted diagnostics or flexible strain sensors.

Researchers show how nanoscale patterning can decrease metal fatigue

A new study in the journal Nature shows how metals can be patterned at the nanoscale to be more resistant to fatigue, the slow accumulation of internal damage from repetitive strain. The research focused on metal manufactured with nanotwins, tiny linear boundaries in a metal’s atomic lattice that have identical crystalline structures on either side.

Norwegian ultrasound researchers among the very best

This is confirmed by the international journal Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology. Researchers at SINTEF, NTNU and St. Olavs Hospital at the National Competence Service for ultrasound and image processing have long been working on the use of 3D ultrasound in various clinical procedures.

This is the world’s first autonomus battery-powered containtership

Each year, 40,000 diesel-fuelled lorries pass through the gates of Yara’s fertiliser manufacturing plant in Porsgrunn, Norway. But not for long. In a few years time, all these loads will be transferred to an autonomous ship: A battery driven container vessel, the Yara Birkeland. This is good news for all those concerned about local noise and air pollution, but the real benefit will be seen when such vessels are being mass-produced and making a global contribution to reducing the effects of climate change.

Machine learning used to predict earthquakes in a lab setting

A group of researchers from the UK and the US have used machine learning techniques to successfully predict earthquakes. Although their work was performed in a laboratory setting, the experiment closely mimics real-life conditions, and the results could be used to predict the timing of a real earthquake.

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