Society

Society

Society in an age of robots

How Society is Changing in the Second Machine Age

Technology is shaping society, as it has always done so, but at a rate never experienced before in the history of mankind. This department is tracking the impact technology has on the fabric of our societies and humanity in general.

How to store information in your clothes invisibly, without electronics

A new type of smart fabric developed at the University of Washington could pave the way for jackets that store invisible passcodes and open the door to your apartment or office. The UW computer scientists have created fabrics and fashion accessories that can store data — from security codes to identification tags — without needing any on-board electronics or sensors.

Fully integrated circuits printed directly onto fabric

Researchers have successfully incorporated washable, stretchable and breathable electronic circuits into fabric, opening up new possibilities for smart textiles and wearable electronics. The circuits were made with cheap, safe and environmentally friendly inks, and printed using conventional inkjet printing techniques.

Innovative material for soft sensor could bring new tactile tech

A new type of soft and stretchable sensor could find uses in applications ranging from athletics and health monitoring to prosthetics and virtual reality. The technology, called iSoft, is capable of sensing in real-time, or without delay, and can perform “multimodal” sensing, or sensing a variety of stimuli such as continuous contact and stretching in all directions.

In a first for wearable optics, researchers develop stretchy fiber to capture body motion

New fiber could offer safer, more reliable alternative to electrical motion sensors. The exciting applications of wearable sensors have sparked a tremendous amount of research and business investment in recent years. Sensors attached to the body or integrated into clothing could allow athletes and physical therapists to monitor their progress, provide a more detailed level of motion capture for computer games or animation, help engineers build robots with a lighter touch or form the basis for new types of real-time health monitors.

Wearables to boost security of voice-based log-in

A security-token necklace, ear buds or eyeglasses developed at the University of Michigan could eliminate vulnerabilities in voice authentication—the practice of logging in to a device or service with your voice alone. Talking to electronics has become a popular—even essential—way to command them. In this era of the internet of things, voice assistants connect people to their mobile devices, homes and vehicles.

Future smartwatches could sense hand movement using ultrasound imaging

New research has shown future wearable devices, such as smartwatches, could use ultrasound imaging to sense hand gestures. Computers are growing in number and wearable computers, such as smartwatches, are gaining popularity. Devices around the home, such as WiFi light bulbs and smart thermostats, are also on the increase. However, current technology limits the capability to interact with these devices.

Matthew Dahlitz

Matthew Dahlitz

Department Head

Matthew is Editor-in-Chief of The Neuropsychotherapist, a psychotherapist with a keen interest in neuroscience and technology.

Latest Magazine

Get the Magazine At:

Stay Updated

* indicates required

Latest Magazine

Get the Magazine At:

Stay Updated

* indicates required
Powered by WishList Member - Membership Software
support
Need Help?
Support Ticket